New SAT Conversion Chart: Old 2400 to New 1600 (Official)

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In March 2016, the SAT underwent

a massive redesign

, part of which included a change to its scoring system:

it shifted from a 2400-point scale to a 1600-point scale.

But how do you compare a new SAT score with one on the old SAT 2400 scale? What scores are colleges looking for since some still don’t have data on the new SAT?

The official new SAT to old SAT conversion charts below offer the most accurate score conversions from one SAT to the other. If you need to convert your new SAT score to an old SAT score, or vice versa,

simply


use our handy conversion tool below to find your score.

After you get your SAT conversion, keep reading—I tell you

why

it’s easier to get a higher SAT score than before due to the

new SAT scoring advantage (the new SAT score is higher in certain score regions!)

.


Disappointed with your scores? Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points?

We’ve written a guide about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:






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Old 2400 SAT to New 1600 SAT Conversion Tool

If you’ve taken both the new SAT and old SAT and want to know which test you’ve done better on, this tool will do that automatically for you.

Enter your old SAT scores on the

LEFT

to get your new SAT scores on the

RIGHT.


Enter your old 2400 SAT here:





Get new 1600 SAT scores here:







New 1600 SAT to Old 2400 SAT Conversion Tool

Alternatively, if you want to input your new SAT scores and get old SAT scores, here’s how to do it:


Enter your new 1600 SAT here:




Get old 2400 SAT scores here:







Official Old SAT to New SAT Conversion Charts

We created our conversion tools above using the College Board’s

official SAT conversion charts

. Now, we give you actual conversion tables so that you can see more clearly how new SAT scores match up with old SAT scores (and vice versa).

Before you use these tables, know that the most accurate conversion method is to

split up the score conversion section by section.

In other words, don’t just use the College Board’s total composite conversion chart (from 2400 to 1600); these can be inaccurate as they ignore the fact that individual sections convert scores differently.

For example, if you’re converting from an old SAT score to a new SAT score, you’d do the following:

  • Get your old SAT Math score (out of 800) and convert it to a new SAT Math score (out of 800).
  • Get your old Reading + Writing score (out of 1600) and convert it to a new SAT Reading + Writing score (out of 800).

Old SAT Math to New SAT Math Conversion Table

Math is straightforward because both the new SAT and old SAT Math sections are out of 800.


Old SAT Math

New SAT Math

Old SAT Math

New SAT Math

Old SAT Math

New SAT Math
800 800 600 620 400 440
790 800 590 610 390 430
780 790 580 600 380 420
770 780 570 590 370 410
760 780 560 580 360 400
750 770 550 570 350 390
740 760 540 570 340 380
730 760 530 560 330 370
720 750 520 550 320 360
710 740 510 540 310 360
700 730 500 530 300 350
690 720 490 520 290 340
680 710 480 510 280 330
670 700 470 510 270 310
660 690 460 500 260 300
650 670 450 490 250 280
640 660 440 480 240 260
630 650 430 470 230 250
620 640 420 460 220 230
610 630 410 450 210 220
200 200

Old SAT Reading + Writing to New SAT Reading + Writing Conversion Table

On the old SAT, Reading and Writing were separate sections, each out of 800. On the new SAT, however, these two sections are combined for a total Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) score out of 800.

In this table, we added the old SAT Reading and Writing sections together to get a single Reading and Writing score out of 1600.


Old R+W

New R+W

Old R+W

New R+W

Old R+W

New R+W
1600 800 1200 650 800 450
1590 800 1190 650 790 440
1580 800 1180 650 780 440
1570 790 1170 640 770 430
1560 790 1160 640 760 430
1550 780 1150 630 750 420
1540 780 1140 630 740 420
1530 780 1130 620 730 410
1520 770 1120 620 720 410
1510 770 1110 610 710 400
1500 770 1100 610 700 400
1490 760 1090 600 690 390
1480 760 1080 600 680 390
1470 760 1070 590 670 380
1460 750 1060 590 660 380
1450 750 1050 580 650 370
1440 750 1040 580 640 370
1430 740 1030 570 630 360
1420 740 1020 570 620 360
1410 740 1010 560 610 360
1400 730 1000 560 600 350
1390 730 990 550 590 350
1380 730 980 550 580 340
1370 720 970 540 570 340
1360 720 960 540 560 330
1350 710 950 530 550 330
1340 710 940 530 540 330
1330 710 930 520 530 320
1320 700 920 510 520 320
1310 700 910 510 510 310
1300 700 900 500 500 310
1290 690 890 500 490 300
1280 690 880 490 480 290
1270 680 870 490 470 280
1260 680 860 480 460 270
1250 680 850 480 450 260
1240 670 840 470 440 240
1230 670 830 460 430 230
1220 660 820 460 420 220
1210 660 810 450 410 210
400 200

Using the two section tables above, you can convert any scores from the new SAT to the old SAT, and vice versa. You can then add up the scores you find to get your composite score.

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Composite New SAT to Old SAT Conversion Chart

This SAT conversion table is the one I recommend

not

using since it goes from composite score to composite score.

This manner of translating scores is less accurate than splitting up your composite score section by section as recommended above.

For example, here are two scenarios of a student with an 1800 score on the old SAT. If you just use the table below, you’d get 1290 as your new total SAT score. But this is just an approximation—if you use your section scores, you end up with entirely different conversions!


Scenario 1

  • Old SAT

    • Math: 800
    • Reading: 600
    • Writing: 400

    • Composite: 1800/2400
  • New SAT

    • New Math: 800
    • New Reading + Writing: 560

    • New Composite: 1360/1600


Scenario 2

  • Old SAT

    • Math: 600
    • Reading: 600
    • Writing: 600

    • Composite: 1800/2400
  • New SAT

    • New Math: 620
    • New Reading + Writing: 650

    • New Composite: 1270/1600

Notice how in both scenarios, the old composite score adds up to 1800, but the new composite score

varies by nearly 100 points.

Once again, if you were to use the table below, you’d get 1290 for both, but this conversion is clearly less accurate since the two scenarios above yield wildly different scores when converting by section.

Regardless,

here’s the official SAT composite score conversion chart for your reference:


New SAT

Old SAT

New SAT

Old SAT

New SAT

Old SAT

1600
2390-2400
1200
1660-1670
800
1050-1060

1590
2360-2380
1190
1650
790
1040

1580
2340-2350
1180
1630-1640
780
1020-1030

1570
2320-2330
1170
1620
770
1010

1560
2300-2310
1160
1600-1610
760
990-1000

1550
2270-2290
1150
1590
750
980

1540
2250-2260
1140
1570-1580
740
960-970

1530
2230-2240
1130
1560
730
940-950

1520
2210-2220
1120
1540-1550
720
930

1510
2180-2200
1110
1520-1530
710
910-920

1500
2160-2170
1100
1510
700
900

1490
2140-2150
1090
1490-1500
690
880-890

1480
2120-2130
1080
1480
680
870

1470
2100-2110
1070
1460-1470
670
860

1460
2090
1060
1450
660
850

1450
2070-2080
1050
1430-1440
650
840

1440
2050-2060
1040
1420
640
830

1430
2030-2040
1030
1400-1410
630
820

1420
2020
1020
1380-1390
620
810

1410
2000-2010
1010
1370
610
800

1400
1980-1990
1000
1350-1360
600
790

1390
1970
990
1340
590
780

1380
1950-1960
980
1320-1330
580
770

1370
1930-1940
970
1310
570
760

1360
1920
960
1300
560
750

1350
1900-1910
950
1280-1290
550
740

1340
1880-1890
940
1270
540
730

1330
1870
930
1250-1260
530
730

1320
1850-1860
920
1240
520
720

1310
1840
910
1220-1230
510
710

1300
1820-1830
900
1210
500
700

1290
1800-1810
890
1190-1200
490
690

1280
1790
880
1180
480
680

1270
1770-1780
870
1160-1170
470
670

1260
1760
860
1150
460
660

1250
1740-1750
850
1130-1140
450
650

1240
1730
840
1120
440
640

1230
1710-1720
830
1100-1110
430
630

1220
1700
820
1090
420
620

1210
1680-1690
810
1070-1080
410
610

400
600

What Does the Conversion Chart Say About the New SAT?

The official conversion tables show that the

new SAT has higher scores than expected across the entire score range.

For a full explanation, read our

guide on the new SAT scoring advantage

. That said, I’ll summarize the main points below.

Without the College Board’s concordance table, you might imagine that you could just multiply the old SAT score by 2/3 to get your new SAT score. For example, 2400 * 2/3 = 1600. Or, 1800 * 2/3 = 1200.

In fact,

new SAT scores are much higher than this simple formula would predict.

An 1800 on the old SAT actually translates to 1290—that’s 90 points higher than 1200. Likewise, a 1500 on the old SAT translates to 1090, or 90 points higher than 1000.


This also reflects section by section.

A 700 on the old SAT Math section is equivalent to a 730 on the new SAT Math section, while a 500 on the old SAT is equivalent to a 530 on the new SAT. What this means is that for the same performance on Math, you get a higher score on the new SAT than you would have on the old SAT.

So what does this mean for you? Some people worry that this means grade inflation is happening, and that scores are creeping up.

But I’m not personally worried about it, and you don’t need to be either.

The College Board will

always

grade the SAT in such a way that top students can be distinguished from average students, and average students from below-average students.


What really matters is your

score percentile

, and

the score that colleges believe is good

.

If everyone’s SAT score goes up, then colleges will require higher scores for admission as well. This doesn’t mean anything about how hard it is to get that score—the difficulty is likely going to stay similar.

For now, just focus on

studying for the SAT

and getting the highest score possible!

What’s Next?


Curious about how the new SAT scoring system benefits you?

Read our comprehensive guide to the

new SAT scoring advantage

to learn how the current version of the SAT gives you optically higher scores over a range of scores.


Want to get a perfect SAT score?

Then check out

our guide on getting a 1600 SAT score, written by a perfect SAT scorer

.


What’s a good SAT score for you?

The answer to this question depends on your goals. Learn

how to calculate a great SAT target score

in our in-depth guide.


Disappointed with your scores? Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points?

We’ve written a guide about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:






Get eBook: 5 Tips for 160+ Points